Why A Recruiter Might Be Your Most Important Hire

Posted: May 23  |  By: Janet Berry-Johnson

What did you learn in college? Finance, management, accounting, economics and marketing, along with the foundations of English, mathematics and science. No matter where you went to school or what you majored in, it’s probably safe to say you didn’t have an opportunity to take Hiring 101.

Hiring the right people is one of the most important – and most challenging – aspects of running a business today. Most professionals play it by ear when it comes to interviewing and hiring. Sometimes it works out. But sometimes they learn the hard way, losing valuable time and resources to a hiring mistake.

That’s why sometimes your most important hire may be someone who doesn’t even work in your office. It’s a recruiter who knows how to create a job description, negotiate a compensation package, evaluate resumes and ask the right questions to help you find the right fit for a role.

Here’s a look at why a recruiter may be one of the most valuable members of your team.

Expertise

Recruiters often have experience in the industry they’re hiring for, so they have the expertise to discern a good fit for the roles they’re tasked with filling.

Today’s leadership roles often require a professional with a unique mix of skills. A recruiter can help you identify crucial technical and core capabilities. They will also lead the search and pre-screen potential candidates who have the right skills and experience to be successful.

Recruiting the right people is a strategic and time-consuming project. Having employees who are inexperienced or trying to fit it into their other responsibilities is usually a waste of energy and takes time away from other crucial business projects. It also increases the chances of hiring the wrong person.

Discretion

Sometimes, you need to identify a replacement for an underperforming executive who is still in the role. This can be tricky because you can’t advertise the position or ask others in the organization for referrals.

A recruiter can speak to interested candidates who may be currently working in your industry – perhaps even for a competitor – without divulging the identity of your company. This will prevent alerting outsiders to the fact that change is on the horizon.

A Recruiter Has an Extensive Network

When you want to cast a wide net to fill an important role, you can advertise the opening in trade magazines and on online job boards. But you’ll usually find that your HR department will be overrun by resumes and applications from people who lack the experience and qualifications you’re looking for.

You won’t find the best candidates for high-level legal and finance roles simply by using those go-to methods. Top executives aren’t scouring job boards. They’re busy leaders who find their next opportunity through their network, which often includes recruiters.

Creativity

A good recruiter can think outside the box and attract a set of candidates that another professional might not have considered. When you need to fill a role, your natural tendency is to look at people currently working in your industry. But often, the necessary skill set to be successful in the position isn’t unique to your industry. You may find someone with experience managing a diverse workforce, the ability to drive change and produce results in a variety of places. A good recruiter can suss out the essential qualities and find them in people and places that aren’t always obvious.

The cost of a bad hire can be considerable, so why learn about hiring the hard way? When you need to find the right candidate for an executive role, your first hire should be a recruiter who can handle that job for you.

When you do find the right hire, ensure that you’re paying them right with our 2018 Accounting & Finance Salary Guide.

Get email updates about more content like this!

Submit your resume

Submit your resume to apply for one of our executive level positions available nationwide.

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
resume